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Solid-state batteries can reduce the carbon footprint of electric vehicles by 39%

Several automakers, battery suppliers and startups are investing in the technology

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An editor at eMobilCar


  • 2 min read

Transport & Environment (T&E) has produced a report that solid state batteries can reduce the carbon footprint of electric vehicles by 39%.

A report compiled by Minviro, a raw material lifecycle analysis company, compares the total carbon footprint of solid state batteries with two of today's most popular lithium-ion chemistries: Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC) and Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP).

The analysis showed that solid-state batteries achieved an overall reduction of 24% with technology alone and 39% if sustainable materials were used. It is also worth noting that LFP batteries have a slightly higher carbon footprint in these calculations.

The report says that solid-state batteries can use 35% more lithium than current lithium-ion chemistries, but much less graphite and cobalt. T&E also expects new mining methods, such as extracting lithium from geothermal wells, to come into play and reduce the environmental impact of lithium sources.

Solid-state batteries, which take their name from the solid electrolyte used in place of liquid in today's lithium-ion batteries, were mainly advertised for their energy density. Some automakers, including Nissan, have suggested that semiconductor technology could help make certain kinds of electric pickups and SUVs possible.

While several automakers, battery suppliers and startups are investing in the technology, solid-state batteries won't be ready for commercial use until the end of the decade.

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